The town of Grindsted

The town of Grindsted has developed from a small farming community that has been here as far back as history records. Until the advent of the railway in 1914, this area of the country led a quiet and unregarded life. Farming was hard, because arable land had to be wrested from the vast moorlands.
Efforts to cultivate these heaths were made in the 18th and 19th centuries, after the old manors and their estates had let the land run to seed and were finally sold off in previous centuries. From the middle of the 1800s, wealthy Copenhagen businessmen purchased large areas of the surrounding countryside, building hunting lodges and establishing fine plantations of fir and pine. This was part of a national resurgence after a disastrous war, when a large part of Southern Jutland was lost in 1864.

Grindsted has developed from being a railway junction at the heart of a network of lines spreading across central Jutland, into the modest shopping centre for a wide upland today.
The town has many educational establishments - agricultural college, technical school, business college, 6th form college, domestic science college, adult education centre etc. It has also a fair-sized chemical works as well as abattoir and meat-processing plants.
The population living within the council area Billund Kommune (2014) is ca. 26.300 (within 38.000 hectares) - the actual population of the town itself is ca. 9.600.
The town attracts commuters from out-lying areas, as well as supplying workers for the nearby Lego factory and Legoland park in Billund, its domestic and international airport, or work-places in nearby west-coast Esbjerg, east-coast Vejle, and the manufacturing towns of Herning and Horsens to the north.
All these towns have enjoyed relative prosperity and offer excellent facilities and cultural activities. Ribe, the oldest town in Denmark, with its cobbled streets, half-timbered buildings and 12th century cathedral, is also within easy distance to the south.